Community. Conversation. Connection.

Hope for the Stupid

I wake up in the morning and even in the dim light, I can make out objects in my bedroom. I don’t have to rev my eyes up or retrain them every day. In fact, I’ve never had to train them at all. They were made to see and help process what’s around me.

Healthy eyes just see.

Tozer in The Pursuit of God makes a great correlation between looking on God and believing. They are the same, and that simplicity sometimes trips us up.

We think it must be harder than that. We think we have to fight, to learn more, to grow, to achieve–then we’ll be able to see God, but He gave each of us a measure of faith so we already have what it takes.

Now, if faith is the gaze of the heart at God, and if this gaze is but the raising of the inward eyes to meet the all-seeing eyes of God, then it follows that it is one of the easiest things possible to do… Since believing is looking, it can be done without special equipment or religious paraphernalia.

There is hope for the stupid! And when I say that, I’m looking first to myself and taking great joy in that statement. I can convince myself (or be convinced) that God is after my strength, my effort, my wisdom, my talents, or anything else but that’s just stupid-talk.

He’s looking to see if I’ll look at Him in reverence and worship. Will I lift my eyes in faith and trust? Is there anything I can’t receive apart from this beholding?

Our ‘religious paraphernalia’ and some man-made traditions actually make things cloudier, dimmer when they are supposed to make them clearer. They complicate what was intended by our Creator to be simple. To borrow a line from the old ads, “it’s so easy a caveman could do it.”

Most definitely, faith and eyesight have to be maintained and can be sharpened, but we can start wherever we are and begin looking upon Him, beholding His glory, and returning His gaze of love with our own of worship.

It’s as easy as opening your eyes and turning your head. I’m ready to see more clearly.

What are your thoughts on this? Have you ever embraced a complicated faith? What does that do to your spiritual life?


Welcome to week 13 of our book club discussion of the Pursuit of God (disclosure) by A.W. Tozer. We are taking a sentence, paragraph, or passage that inspires, encourages, or challenges and writing about it, taking two weeks for each chapter. If you have a response on your blog, head over to my friend and co-facilitator, Sarah Salter’s blog for the widget and another great take. Whether you’ve read the chapter or not, please share your thoughts! We always appreciate a vibrant conversation.

8 Comments

  1. Good thoughts. I’ve definitely been guilty of getting in the complicated mode. One of those “put everything in the right place and then go in” mentalities. If I could really do that, where’s my need for Him and the change that He brings when I surrender myself in faith and worship? I am getting better at looking up where I am instead of trying to get to another place and then looking up.
    Philip recently posted..31, A Musical Reflection With No Accompanying MusicMy Profile

    • Man, that’s the question of the ages, yet so many forget that we desperately need Him! I want to live in that knowledge and that overflow. Thanks Philip!

  2. I have to say your title brought many things to mind!

    I agree, we are the ones who make things harder than it is.

    While I don’t believe in Santa anymore, as a child he was easy to believe in. But now I wonder how could I have ever thought one man could travel the world in one night? And how could someone so plump go down a chimney?
    On and on the questions go. Yet as a child it all made sense.

    I think we do the same with Christ, only in reverse. Coming to know Christ as Savior really is simple but we make it harder than it has to be. Guess that’s why we need child like faith!

    • Absolutely! I like that--like Santa in reverse. He makes it so simple so anyone who will humble themselves and come as a child can know Him. It’s a beautiful thing! Thanks TC.

  3. I like the idea Tozer related about actually seeing with the heart. We are so much more than the flesh and bone that make us up. Our soul was created with the ability to know God from the inside out. From the outside in never works.

    This was one of my favorite lines in this chapter; The man who has struggled to purify himself and has had nothing but repeated failures will experience real relief when he stops tinkering with his soul and looks away to the perfect One. While he looks at Christ the very things he has so long been trying to do will be getting done within him. It will be God working in him to will and to do.

    Looking out from ourselves is the key to finding God and His will.

    • Love that quote and your thoughts. The enemy loves when we become self-consumed if that self-consumption is us trying to make ourselves better! Why? Just like you said, it never works. We need to look to Him and He’s waiting for just that. Thanks Floyd.

  4. My faith is pretty simple Jason. I am not a deep thinker so I don’t delve into the deeper things of the faith. I believe and accept what the Bible says is true. People may call me simple but that is ok. I am comfortable with that. :) My one desire is to pursue God with all I have.
    bill (cycleguy) recently posted..TrafficMy Profile

    • Amen, Bill. If we would listen and obey the simplest truths of His word, we would prove wiser than the wisest. The Spirit searches the deep things of God and reveals them to us, but it’s never the complicated, convoluted things we imagine. It is His light, life, and love expressed in amazing ways. Thanks so much, Bill.